Osteoarthritis (OA) in Youngsters?

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My daily intake.

When people hear of arthritis, they usually have pictures of old people in their mind but the onset of Osteoarthritis (OA) can strike anyone between 20 to 40 years of age. Falling into this age category as an active sports person, I have had an old injury recur twice recently, immobilising me on one of my dive trips. The only relief I got was being in the water as I became weightless then. Symptoms of this possible onset of OA include joint pain, tenderness, stiffness, locking and ‘crackling’ of joints caused by loss of cartilage by the wear & tear of the joints. Sharp pains shot right down my legs and upon returning to KL, I went to see my chiropractor immediately. He adjusted my hip & pushed it back into socket and I rested for two weeks before I prepared for my China expedition.

OA is associated with the breakdown of cartilage in joints, commonly occurring int eh weight-bearing joints of the hips, knees & spine although it can affect other areas too. What is this cartilage? Think of it as the shock absorbers in between your joints that give the spongy cushioning that it deserves. When that wears off, the grinding of the bones will cause pain & a lot of discomfort. I had to find alternatives to not suffer such severe pains when my hip occasionally falls out of socket from my vigorous activities so I sought the advice of a scientist he told me to up the dosage of my supplements from 500mg to 1,500mg per day for the first 3 months before regulating a lesser dose daily. I’m now on the 3rd week of taking Livewell Ostesamin that contain glucosamine sulphate & MSM (methylsulfonylmethane) supplements which has helped me control the mortifying pain & allowed me to carry on my usual active lifestyle. If my body is wearing away cartilage, what about the older folks? Cartilage repair is even slower amongst seniors and the only way is to take supplements as they may not have the luxury of hip replacement surgeries.

Keeping my weight in check is another crucial factor in preventing further effects of OA. The heavier you are, the more weight your bones have to carry & whilst our joints degenerate, you wouldn’t want them to work overtime unnecessarily & causing you excruciating pain in the process. I bought a core muscles builder exerciser for me to train and strengthen my core muscles to hold my posture upright, one of the ways of lessening the stress on my spine as the nerves were also pinched when my hip got dislocated. I walk as much as I can & have whole grain carbohydrates, lean protein with lots of vegetables in my diet. If you are overweight, you would definitely benefit from weight loss which would help you ease pressure on your knees. Though I’m not overweight, I have a duty to keep fit for the work that I do and being immobilised by pain is not something I see myself accepting! Yes, though ageing is a part of life that I can accept, what I can’t is if OA sets in. If I can do something to prevent it now, I will give it my all. We cannot prevent ageing but we can slow down the process by living a healthy lifestyle, eating a proper diet & have regular exercise.

Supplements that are really effective include Glucosamine + Chondroitin Sulphate and MSM. You can get them here:-

http://www.livewell2u.com/products.php?p=ostesamin

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